Thursday, June 24th, 2021

What Happened to Literacy Rates After Primary Education was Made Compulsory?

During the time of the Industrial revolution in the nineteenth century, the question “What happened to literacy rates after primary education was made compulsory?” is very common. At that time, education was mainly provided by the means of books and class lecture. Teachers usually do not encourage kids to learn how to read. The question “What happened to literacy rates after primary education was made compulsory?”

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In the United States, too, reading test scores were not encouraged until a few years after elementary school completion. In France, the first attempt at compulsory primary education did not succeed in France. The result of this was that it failed to produce the high standards of literacy that are prevalent all over the world today. For that reason, France soon made education a legal requirement for all children below the age of thirteen.

In recent decades, efforts have been made to make primary education more widely available. Various studies have shown that children from lower income families are more likely to drop out of school before completing their secondary level education than children from higher income families. The study also shows that students from disadvantaged families are more likely to suffer from long-term consequences associated with poverty. Children from poor or disadvantaged families are more likely to be incarcerated, have longer periods of unemployment and live in poor conditions than those who have a better education. So, the question “What happened to literacy rates after compulsory primary education was made compulsory?”

In many ways, compulsory primary education is not only a challenge but an opportunity. It is a chance to break down the barriers of poverty and illiteracy. A chance to learn, to develop, to become more knowledgeable about the world. Unfortunately, some people see compulsory primary education as a means of breaking down those who are innocent of any criminal offense. They may point to cases like that of Lance Armstrong or Oprah Winfrey, who are arrested and suspended from school for drug use.

What Happened to Literacy Rates After Primary Education was Made Compulsory

However, it is important to remember that compulsory primary education does not cause such offenses. Whether you agree with it or not, compulsory primary education is a great opportunity for children to develop skills and knowledge that they will need in life. To ban this education just because some people do not agree with it is simply unjust. Just as those who want to keep education down are unable to see the opportunity for something better in life, those against compulsory primary education are also unable to see an alternative to what has occurred.

The most likely explanation as to what happened to literacy rates after primary education has nothing to do with those who were arrested for using drugs or alcohol. Those who were arrested were found to have been using drugs and / or alcohol without proper parental guidance or knowledge. These children then continued their usage and the same happened with those who did not. Those who do not continue to use drugs or drink after secondary school education are generally found to have learned some social skills that they could carry on with them throughout life. Those who did use drugs and / or drank find that they need little or no further social interaction with others to make them happy.

Those who were arrested for using drugs and / or alcohol did not just “fall into” it. There was a progression from using drugs and / or drinking to being an abuser. It is not true, “Drugs make the man”. It is also not true, “Using drugs and / or alcohol automatically makes a person lazy”.

Those who were arrested for drug offences did indeed end up in prison. The number of imprisonment for drug offences has increased since the possession of drugs was made illegal in 2021. Those who do not believe that compulsory primary education will make a person lazy are not the right people to ask. After all, laziness is not a good trait. What happened to literacy rates after primary education is the opposite of what should happen.